Daniel Hoornweg

Daniel Hoornweg

Taking a systems approach, my research focuses on how we might build better cities. This includes material flow analysis (especially energy and solid waste), transportation, and the local science and politics of sustainability.

How quickly we build sustainability into our cities is the most important task facing humanity.

The number of people living in cities will double by 2050, and our collective impact on the planet (almost all of which is caused by people living in cities) is already well beyond safe planetary limits. Cities generate the world’s wealth and dynamism. However, can they do so, with much less negative impact? We need to change the way we build, power and live within our cities differently.

Taking a systems approach, my research focuses on how we might build better cities. This includes material flow analysis (especially energy and solid waste), transportation, and the local science and politics of sustainability.

Bio

Following almost 20 years with the World Bank, including as Lead Advisor overseeing Sustainable Cities and Climate Change programs, I returned to Ontario in 2012. I am now Associate Professor and Richard Marceau Chair at the UOIT.
My academic background includes degrees in Earth Sciences (University of Waterloo), a Masters in Environmental Engineering (Guelph) and a PhD in Civil (Sustainability) Engineering (University of Toronto, 2015).
I am also the Chief Safety and Risk Officer for the Province of Ontario (Technical Standards and Safety Authority, TSSA).
My most recent books are ‘Cities and Sustainability: A New Approach’ (Routledge 2016) and editor of ‘Letters to a Young Engineer’ (Canadian engineering convocations 2014 – 2018).